RyePA (a.k.a. 99° IPA)

I used rye malt for the first time this year in my award winning Saison, and I do believe the spicy flavor it added made that beer the standout it was.  I felt the rye’s spicy flavor could add complexity to an IPA.  I had purchased a variety of American hops so it was just a matter of coming up with a recipe.

American IPAs can be wonderful things – an exciting aroma couple with a substantial hop bitterness and an overlay of spicy, citrusy, piney hop aroma. Or they can be a muddled mess.  It just depends.  But most brewers agree it is all about the hops, the malt bill should be pretty simple and the yeast non aggressive.  So I went with a major portion of US two row at the base, a couple of crystal malts, and a slug of rye:

Grain

Brand

Color (°L)

Percent by Weight

Two Row Malt

Briess

1.8

82%

Crystal Malt

Briess

10

5%

Crystal Malt

Briess

60

5%

Rye Malt

Unknown

3.5

8%

Hops

% AA

Weight (g)

Boil Time (min)

Summit

17.6

14

55

Centennial

8.7

28

10

Columbus

13.9

28

10

Simcoe

12.2

28

0

Amarillo

9.3

30

0

Centennial

8.7

12

Dry

Simcoe

12.2

12

Dry

Amarillo

9.3

12

Dry

Original Gravity

17.2°P or 1.071

Final Gravity

2.6°P or 1.010

Estimated IBUs

59

Estimated ABV

7.9%

Estimated Color

11 SRM

Mashed for 100 minutes at 65.6°C and boiled for 60 minutes.

Pitched one package (about 11 grams) of Safale US-05 dry yeast.  The yeast was rehydrated in warm water prior to pitching.  Added 75 seconds of pure oxygen through a stone. Pitched yeast at 19°C and held at that temperature for 3 days. On day three set the controller to 21°C and let the temperature rise naturally to that temperature. After ten days in primary the beer was dry transferred to a corny keg and dry hopped for 11 days, the transferred to final packaging (bottles and a corny keg).

It was a hot, hot summer day in Western PA when I brewed this beer, hence the 99 degree moniker.  Despite the extended primary and eleven days of dry hopping the beer was still on tap a mere 21 days after brewing.  And what a beer it is. The hop aroma is piney. The flavor consists of a piney/orange/tangerine quality from the hops, along with a earthy spiciness from the rye, I think.  The bitterness and graininess really work well together.

I think it is a wonderfully complex IPA that will grab your attention.

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