Yeast Stats

I have a predilection to record data.  I think I was born that way, I am not sure. I have a little book in the glovebox of my car where in which I carefully record the date and mileage for every tank of fuel I buy.  I used to keep a record of every round of golf I played, but as I seem to keep getting worse at that game I have managed to give up that particular addiction (the record keeping, not the game).

Anyway, fancying myself a better brewer than golfer you can bet I keep lots of records about brewing.  I have kept a record of every batch I have made (167) including the ingredients, batch size, fermentation info, etc.   Recently I reviewed the information about the yeasts I have used.

Of the 167 batches, roughly one third were fermented with dry yeast, one third with White Labs yeast and one third with Wyeast.  In my early days of homebrewing the local shop carried only Wyeast, but at some point early on they switched to White Labs.  As readers of the blog know I have had my issues with White Lab yeasts, so today I am more likely to use either a dry yeast or order Wyeast online.

In total I have used 42 different yeasts: 18 from White Labs, 17 from Wyeast and 7 different dry varieties.  Since some brands are ostensibly the same yeast (e.g., Wyeast 1056 and Safale US-05) I cannot say I have actually used 42 different types of yeast.

Variety

Number of Uses

Average

OG

Attenuation

Windsor
Ale

21

1.046

65%

Nottingham
Ale

20

1.054

76%

WLP 002 –
English Ale

13

1.048

75%

Safale
US-05

12

1.049

80%

WY 3711 –
French Saison

9

1.057

95%

WY 1084 –
Irish Ale

6

1.041

71%

WY 1469 –
West Yorkshire

6

1.047

79%

WLP 008 –
East Coast Ale

5

1.056

73%

WY 2124 –
Bohemian Lager

5

1.054

76%

WLP 500 –
Trappist Ale

5

1.072

83%

 

As you can tell, I like dry yeast. I like its convenience and the fact that it is easy to pitch the correct amount of yeast, versus liquid that is always a bit of a guessing game. I have never done a direct side by side comparison of dry and liquid varieties, but despite a lot of hullabaloo from liquid yeast proponents, I suspect there is little difference between the two. Personally I have not written a book with the owner of a company who sells liquid yeast cultures, so unlike other people with a radio show I am pretty neutral in this situation. Now for certain beers it is hard to find just the right dry yeast. I would be surprised if one could make an award winning Trappist Ale or Saison without a proper liquid culture. If anyone thinks they have please let me know.

As for the yeast performance, I must give a shout to the WY 3711 French Saison. At an average of 95% attenuation, it can ferment almost anything. The WLP 500 Trappist is no slouch, either, averaging 83% attenuation on stronger beers. Overall the only one that surprised me a but was the Windsor Ale, the average attenuation of 65% is pretty low. I know I tend to use this yeast in experimental beers, still it surprises me.

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: